Not. Again.

Via the Null Device (link), the timely announcement that it’s time for the yearly Eurovision Songcontest (link) and all the hoopla and camp that comes with it. Actually, the very first link goes to Der Spiegel, which is an article that discusses the deeper meaning of the much, uh, lamented, contest in the universe and its, uh, how can I say this properly, appeal:

Many of these acts are like swans emerging from the shadows — they are underdog stories that gays can identify with. This idea of triumphing against the odds and coming out and being the most glamorous and popular person is a narrative that seems very attractive.

I’m not sure if this was always true, I mean the part where the contest became associated and popularized with and within the gay movement. To me it always seemed to have been a gradual process where every year more outrageous, silly and extravagant songs and acts were submitted to the contest’s finals. Nowadays, I have to laugh the moment the Eurovision subject comes up: Besides the extravaganza, I fondly remember the ‘bloc voting’ and ‘sore loser voting’ and of course, the sour remarks of the commentators.