Go version-control yourself.

Posted by – July 18, 2008

So, Everybody can jump like this I was going to give a rant about the painful upgrade to WordPress 2.6, but I’ll leave it at that. Wait. Version control has been added to WordPress, which means that you can finally revert to your previous 42-word entry on your mission-critical blog. I can’t wait for blog software that supports branching and merging. Oh: and looking through the WordPress tables, it looks like complete copies of entries are stored in the wp_post table. Hello there, meet bloated tables 1.

On the good side, I’ve been out a lot shooting (apparent) random photos of city life. I found out that my favourite photos aren’t necessarily the ones that I have published online: the very best ones I shot, are actually portrait photos of people. For example, I truly despise making photos of high-action events: There’s always people walking in front, or, during the composition, you find out that the best part of the whole event just went by in a fraction of a metric microsecondFrog and that you just missed out on the World Press Photo of the Year Finals. This is of course different than making portraits, where you can juggle around and play around with the depth of field and lighting. Particularly, lighting.

The drawback of portraits is that you can’t publish them without particular consent from the photographed subjects. There’s privacy and there’s privacy. That is, unless the subject is an animal that can’t talk back. Consider yourself lucky, then.

Meh.

Update: 1. The upgrade was terribly slow, which I think is because the update script probably had to add new columns to tables.

2. WordPress now adds captions to thumbnails, which completely destroys the existing CSS-stylesheet

3. More details on the excess waste after the fold.

Slightly more details about the extra space. A query on all revisions for the very latest post:

select ID, LENGTH(post_content), post_type, post_parent, post_modified
from wp_posts
where post_parent =
(select MAX(ID) from wp_posts where post_type = 'post')
and post_type = 'revision' order by post_modified DESC;

I get:
+------+----------------------+-----------+-------------+---------------------+
| ID | LENGTH(post_content) | post_type | post_parent | post_modified |
+------+----------------------+-----------+-------------+---------------------+
| 1854 | 2490 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-19 00:08:48 |
| 1870 | 2449 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-19 00:05:44 |
| 1868 | 2363 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:55:47 |
| 1869 | 2363 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:55:47 |
| 1867 | 2363 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:43:30 |
| 1866 | 2363 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:43:29 |
| 1864 | 2362 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:41:56 |
| 1865 | 2362 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:41:56 |
| 1863 | 2063 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:38:51 |
| 1862 | 2063 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:38:50 |
| 1861 | 2064 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:38:04 |
| 1860 | 2064 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:38:03 |
| 1859 | 2064 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:37:24 |
| 1858 | 2064 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:37:23 |
| 1856 | 2026 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:36:44 |
| 1857 | 2026 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:36:44 |
| 1855 | 2220 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:35:03 |
| 1853 | 2220 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:35:02 |
| 1852 | 2213 | revision | 1849 | 2008-07-18 23:34:59 |
+------+----------------------+-----------+-------------+---------------------+
19 rows in set (0.01 sec)

So, yeah, that’s kind of a waste of space for (originally) a simple post of about 2000 characters. Also, guess which IDs are the ‘autosave’ entries (currently, while I’m editing, 5 extra entries were added to the wp_post table). I’d be really surprised when people start to notice that they’re running out of hosting space.

Closed